Dear Educators, Parents & Friends,

 

Once upon a time, we shared bonded and taught through storytelling.  Engaging and educating children full-time with stories has been my passion for over thirty years.  Now, with all things social postponed until the danger of catching Covid-19 subsides, I’m offering for your school community, live online well-told tales with curricular based learning activities.

 

I am prepared to help teachers meet educational goals with live online storytelling story-making. Based on successful programs given at hundreds of schools over the years, please join us on ZOOM for an enchanting educational storytelling experience.  Ask for a program tailored to your students, interests and curriculum.

Fees:

Please note, I am willing to work with schools with tightened budgets during these trying times. 

~ $300. one 45 min. online live performance, $600.  Two shows.  

~ $75 for class workshops

~ $150. For a professionally filmed 30 min. Teaching by Tales story/activity video.

https://youtu.be/CAs1sSQ7fwc

TEACHING by TALES -

Online Storytelling for your Curriculum 

 

Teachers, got cooped up kids and lots of content to cover? Count on an experienced artist-educator to engage your students with online curricular-based storytelling. Share your needs. I’ve got a story and activity for your kids.

Live Online. 

 

How “Teaching by Tales Online” Works

 

Call or email with your grade, current curriculum and the topic you'd like to have covered. I'll tailor a live online line performance/workshop for your class or grade.  It will be a forty-five minute session on  Zoom or Google Meet. 845.216.9087

 

dramatic interactive story will engage your students. Next, they get to turn and talk in breakout rooms or chats. Then, we launch a teacher selected writing activity.  Students get prep guide, online Q & A, and ideas to start them on a follow-up project. 

 

Teachers, it is as direct as saying ‘Second graders.  Fairy Tales, I want them to write their own.’ I'd respond with “The Frog Prince, Ingredients for a Fine Fairy Tale. Here’s how to write a “Prequel.”

 

Teaching by Tales -

Grade by Grade Online Outline 

 

Kindergarten – Online Finger Fables

- Active listening / New Ending Drawing

Story Sample – “Wake Up the  Sun”  

https://youtu.be/JMEuvXVQJsMA

A clock tries to wake the sun.  She gets help from the thunder and the moon. Children must draw a picture with words showing how they will wake the sun.  

 

"Rabbit & Turtle" - Aesop’s classic.  Children’s  hands turned into the fable characters, children better follow and understand this race.  They learn what happened drawing their own Beginning and End” pictures with word bubbles. https://youtu.be/vn_uyWw5pI8

 

First Grade – A Finger Fable - 

 - Sequence drawings with sentences

Story Samples – A variation of Aesop’s Mouse & Lion

Mouse goes against animal peers and helps Lion, twice. Lion and children discover, “You are never too small to help.”  Children get to help tell and better remember the story by being guided to turn their hands into story characters.  They’ll learn to sequence the fable in four drawings beginning middle and end with a describing sentence for each picture.

Snowy Squirrel - A Squirrel looks to find a place to shelter-in during a snow storm. The birds, raccoon and bear have nothing to offer.  Guess who helps? Children draw and then make their own “Squirrel nest.”  https://youtu.be/CAs1sSQ7fwc

Second Grade – Fairy Tale Workshop

- Ingredients for a Fine Fairy Tale  (Cinderella to Anansi ask for your favorite fairy tale to be told)

Story – "The Froggy Prince" - The classic adapted from Charles Perrault showing the “ingredients for a fine fairy tale.”  Following the kiss breaking the spell, children will be guided to write their fairy tale prequel.  Why did the young man gets turned into a frog? They will receive a list of fairy tale ingredients.  A big problem, characters talking, three steps to solve the problem.  A magic helper, and a happy ending.

 

Third Grade – A Tale from Around the World

- Retell in your own words in a new country.

- China, Brazil, Kenya, Poland, Ireland

- Ask for a country, I will have a tale!

Story – "The Stone Cutter" from Japan A circle story where a hot tired stonecutter wishes to be the mighty sun.  Discover a cloud blocks the sun the stonecutter wishes to be the cloud.  The wind blows the cloud and the wish is to be the wind. Then change into a mountain and at last back to the one mighty enough to bring down mountains.  Students retell or draw this story set in a different country or culture they have explored. 

Fourth Grade – Colonial or Revolutionary New York Sample Story Options 

"A Pox Upon Us!" – What George Washington sis to deal with smallpox to help us today. Washington had the pox. Many camped in the Hudson Valley during the Revolution perished from smallpox. - -

- What did George do?  Students will listen to the story, discuss and get guided to write what they learned about 1778 to help us now.

 

"Washington on the Hudson" – “His excellency visited to inspect West Point, check the Smallpox pandemic and saved the nation by putting on his reading glasses.

- Children may imagine they saw Washington and will write a letter describing what happened.  Arnold and Andre – “Treason of the darkest dye!” Exclaimed George Washington when the fight for American Independence almost failed. Students will learn to draw on the story and a few primary sources quotes to write a letter as an eyewitness to events in the story.

Fifth Grade – Tales of the Americas

Two short stories from two different cultures in North America / Retell one of the stories from a different point of view.

Story - The Rainbow Pony  - Mexico adapted from Robert Sans Sour’s book. Three brothers try to stop a corn thief.  The youngest succeeds.  He gets the wrath of his brothers, but a magical helper appears.  Students will retell this tale in a different nation in the western hemisphere. 

Sixth Grade – Greek Myth or Medieval – 

Write a new Greek myth explaining why the Hudson flows both ways.

 

The myth told will be selected by the teachers.  If the Middle Ages is the topic, Students take part online in break out groups of four in a skit.  They will receive an outline before the online class on a topic like table manners, guilds, knighting, falconry, teacher’s choice.  They will film themselves acting out their topic to teach others.

Seventh Grade – American Revolution, The Constitution

 

Sample Story Options –

Sybil’s Revered Ride – The story of the teen from Dutchess County who outrode Paul Revere. Students will write a letter from another character’s point of view to show how they felt about Sybil’s Ride. George Washington on the Hudson Stories - George’s Smallpox Pandemic, Washington’s Watch Chain - Washington Saves the Nation Wearing Glasses 

 

 

Students aided by their storyteller and a partner will make am “Instagram style” film to teach others three things about one of the Washington Stories.

"Ratifying with Hamilton" – The New York State Governor, Assembly and Senate all opposed ratifying the Constitution of the United States.  How Alexander Hamilton changed their minds. We will launch in the online workshop a first-person letter showing what Hamilton said to change minds.

Eight Grade – Civil War and After Slavery

 

A sampling of primary source letters will be read aloud with drama and in period garb by your storyteller online.  Students will share reactions to better understand the fears and challenges of the Civil War and Reconstruction. They will gather and share ideas in the workshop to write their first-person letter about a topic from those times of their choice.  There could, of course, be a one-minute Instagram-like film to show facts too. 

REFERENCES

~ Mr. John Pastore Fourth Grade Teacher Crompond Elementary School, NY jpastore@yorktown.org             

~ Dr. Stephanie Turiselli, Sixth Grade Teacher Tuckahoe Middle School, NY tursellis@tuckahoeschools.org 

 

~Ms. Shantala DuGay ~ PTA Rep. Meadow Pond School, S.Salem, NY shantala.dugay@gmail.com 

Teachers and students will receive information on the story and activity.  This may be illustrations, story-making guides, primary source material, and a written assignment.